Premier League bosses demand controversial new handball rule be scrapped for next season

By | 17th January 2020
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PREMIER LEAGUE bosses want the controversial new handball law to be scrapped.

The rule — that goals scored or created through an accidental handball will not count — was introduced with VAR this season, but has left managers, players and fans exasperated.

Prem bosses want the controversial new handball law to be scrapped
Rex Features
Declan Rice argues as West Ham’s equaliser was chalked off because on an accidental handball in the build up
Rex Features

And the League Managers’ Association has written to the International Football Associations Board to ask for the law to revert back to its old ruling — where handballs were based on the offence being deliberate.

The IFAB board hold their AGM on February 29 when the matter will be discussed.

No changes to rules are allowed during the season, but changes can be made for the 2020-21 campaign.

The LMA’s technical manager John Duncan has been encouraged that there might be the opportunity to change it.

Prem refs have also been ordered to use pitchside monitors in a U-turn by chief Mike Riley.

While Riley had maintained that the video screens were available for incidents that had gone unseen, he had told his officials to accept the verdict of VAR colleagues on all other calls.

The monitors have not been used at all in the first 219 Prem games of the season.

But after ref Michael Oliver used the monitor to send off Crystal Palace midfielder Luka Milovojevic in their FA Cup defeat by Derby, Riley has now instituted a policy change.

From this weekend, referees will be expected to view the monitors and confirm the final decision for themselves if the VAR official either recommends a red card should be shown or that a dismissal is the wrong call by the referee.

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That change will bring the Prem more in line with Uefa and Fifa.

It is felt that using the monitors in such situations will help “sell” the decision to players and supporters, with the referee himself being sure he has made the correct call.

But refs will still be expected to act on the advice of their VAR colleagues on offside, handball and penalty decisions, rather than head to the monitors as they would do in most other leagues and competitions using the technology.

Michael Oliver used the VAR monitor to send off Crystal Palace midfielder Luka Milovojevic in their FA Cup defeat by Derby
Reuters
Referees will be expected to view the monitors and confirm the final decision for themselves if the VAR official recommends a decision
Reuters

This post written by Jack Figg originally appeared on Football news - transfers, fixtures, scores, pictures | The Sun. Read the full post here.

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